Benefits of Organic Cotton on the Skin

Organic cotton is by no means a new concept, however, it’s quickly becoming one of the most preferred types of clothing, especially for babies and toddlers. Not only does organic cotton benefit the environment due to lessened exposure to pesticides, but it helps us avoid exposure to chemicals that can be harmful to our skin — and our overall health! Organic cotton is grown without the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) which means no synthetic pesticides or fertilisers have been sprayed on them. Therefore, they’re healthier for the soil too!

Free from synthetic pesticides

By avoiding exposure to synthetic pesticides, you can maintain comfort with itch-free clothing! Your skin is your biggest organ and whilst it’s the first barrier for your immune system, it’s also absorbent, providing a direct path to your bloodstream. If you spend a lot of time choosing the right skincare products, then it’s potentially just as important to ensure the fabrics you choose to wear are kind to your skin and comfortable.

It’s an ethical and sustainable act

Buying organic clothes is an ethical decision, not just because it’s grown organically, but because you’re also valuing the welfare of farmers and workers. It’s no secret that more consumers are asking for eco-friendly products made from renewable resources like organic cotton. Not every individual is choosing to organic fashion because they suffer from allergies or chemical sensitivities, but because they want to do their part to protect the planet. So you can quickly see just how many reasons there may be to buy organic cotton garments.

Organic cotton is soft and gentle for babies and young children,

A child’s skin is much more sensitive than an adult’s, perhaps overreacting to typical stresses that are usually well tolerated by normal adult skin. If your child suffers from chemical sensitivities we’d recommend you stop buying conventional cotton clothing because health issues can be severe, such as breathing difficulties, watery eyes and chronic headaches and migraines.

Save precious water

Conventional cotton uses about 25% of the world’s insecticide and more than 10% of the pesticides (including insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, defoliants, and growth regulators), and the thought of these pesticides touching your baby’s gentle skin may be difficult enough, however, by choosing to invest in organic cotton for yourself or your little ones, you also save water. Did you know it takes 10,000 litres of water to produce 1 kilo of cotton, meaning it takes about 2,700 litres to make 1 cotton t-shirt! Organic cotton delivers the good in today’s water-stressed world. Organically grown cotton meets strict social and environmental criteria meets the needs of people and the planet! If you’re looking to invest in organic baby clothing that’s strong, durable, beautiful, comfortable and gentle on the skin, we have an extensive range of garments to choose from. You can shop by gender, size or brand, but if you have any questions or need any assistance at all, our cute little Elves are always here to help!

Organic Clothes Are Better For Your Baby’s Sensitive Skin!
Timeless, Sustainable & Organic: How has baby/kids clothing changed in recent years?

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